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Today's News

White House to meet EPA and USDA on Monday to figure out RFS

Biofuels Digest - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 3:14pm

In Washington, on the back of concerns about hardship waivers granted to at least 25 refiners by the Environmental Protection Agency that lets them out of their ethanol blending or RIN obligation and has sent RIN prices crashing as a result, the White House will meet on Monday with staff from the EPA and the US Department of Agriculture to come up with an action plan to resolve issues surrounding the Renewable Fuels Standard once and for all.

Categories: Today's News

US Midwest, farm belt in crisis as US-China trade war, Corn-Oilco RFS war escalate

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 8:41pm

In Washington, China has proposed a 25 percent tariff on US soybeans in response to a list of 1300 Chinese products that may be subject to a 25 percent tariff. China purchases 61 percent of total U.S. soybean exports, and more than 30 percent of overall U.S. soybean production.

In other news, the US Environmental Protection Agency granted a “small refiner” waiver from compliance with the US Renewable Fuel Standard to refineries operated by one of the nation’s largest refining companies, Andeavor.

Action on Soybeans

The background: The U.S. Trade Representative here determined that the acts, policies, and practices of the Government of China related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation covered in the investigation are unreasonable or discriminatory and burden or restrict U.S. commerce. USTR now is seeking public comment and will hold a public hearing regarding a proposed determination on appropriate action in response to these acts, policies, and practices.

US Soybean association response: “It should surprise no one that China immediately retaliated against our most important exports, including soybeans.”, said ASA President and Iowa farmer John Heisdorffer. “We have been warning the administration and members of Congress that this would happen since the prospect for tariffs was raised. That unfortunately doesn’t lend any comfort to the hundreds of thousands of soybean farmers who will be affected by these tariffs. A 25 percent tariff on U.S. soybeans into China will have a devastating effect on every soybean farmer in America. Soybean futures are already down nearly 40 cents a bushel as of this morning. At a projected 2018 crop of 4.3 billion bushels, soybean farmers lost $1.72 billion in value for our crop this morning alone. That’s real money lost for farmers, and it is entirely preventable.”

Action on the RFS

Yesterday, we reported that the Environmental Protection Agency has “so far” granted hardship waivers for 25 smaller refiners, letting them out of the requirement to blend biofuels or purchase sufficient RINs to make up the difference. Applications continue to be received by the agency who says the conditions for receiving the waiver have not changed with the new administration despite 12 to 15 application being the norm for an average year when only half would be granted.

Response from Sen. Chuck Grassley:  “If the reporting is accurate, it appears EPA granted a secret waiver that is legally reserved for small refiners to one of the largest oil refining companies in the country. If refineries are being allowed to retroactively get out of the renewable volume obligations the EPA assigned them in November, that fundamentally undermines the Renewable Fuel Standard. It would also amount to a massive government handout to a big corporation that made billions in profits just last year. Giving big corporations like Andeavor a free pass when other companies are required to follow the law of the land isn’t just unfair, it may be illegal.”

Growth Energy: Growth Energy sent a letter to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt condemning the waiver decision and demanding a moratorium on waivers being issued by EPA. “We ask that EPA immediately cease issuing waivers,” said Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor, “and pause any waiver applications being considered until the agency conducts a full, transparent public comment process to help assure all stakeholders that the new expansion of small refinery waivers are consistent with the goals of the RFS. EPA appears to be operating under the cover of night in a secretive process where the agency acts as judge, jury, and executioner to effectively reduce the overall demand for biofuels in this country absent any public discourse.”

Renewable Fuels Association: RFA CEO Bob Dinneen termed the move “an outrageous abuse of the statute.”

The American Coalition for Ethanol: ACE CEO Brian Jennings added, “The law allows a small refiner (producing less than 75,000 barrels per day) to seek an exemption from the annual blending obligation if it can prove the RFS is causing ‘disproportionate economic hardship’ on its operations. On what planet does Andeavor’s 2017 net profit of $1.5 billion constitute ‘disproportionate economic hardship’ for a “small refiner”? Refiners are reporting billion-dollar profits today while farmers are facing their fifth year of prices at or below the cost of production.”

EPA backs off on higher efficiency for light-duty vehicles

In Washington, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt determined that the current standards (the Final Determination of the Mid-term Evaluation of greenhouse gas emission standards for model year 2022-2025 light-duty vehicles) “are based on outdated information, and that more recent information suggests that the current standards may be too stringent.” The Administrator is withdrawing the previous Final Determination issued by the agency on January 12, 2017.

EPA originally released the Phase 2 (12017-2025) standards in 2012, calling for average industry fleetwide level of 163 grams/mile of carbon dioxide (CO2) in model year 2025, which is equivalent to 54.5 miles per gallon.

Bad news? Maybe not, says Clean Fuels Development Coalition CEO Doug Durante.

Writing in the Digest, Durante said, “The recent announcement that the Trump Administration was taking another look at Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards was a welcome reality check for what is a complex and multi-layered issue. There was an immediate knee jerk reaction that this will send us back to the days of muscle cars and wanton pollution when in truth it may be one of the most positive environmental actions anyone in the ethanol space could have hoped for.

“We have argued to anyone who would listen that vehicles and fuels must be looked at as an integrated system and questioned why EPA would not use all the tools at their disposal, including fuels, and more to the point, high octane fuels. The auto industry, the Department of Energy, and countless others have made it abundantly clear that significant gains in efficiency are there to be had with higher octane fuels in conventional engines.”

Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor added, “For several years, Growth Energy has strongly emphasized the fact that fuels and engines are a system and that high-octane fuels – such as ethanol blends like E25-E30 – should be part of this discussion,”

“We have provided a wealth of data to show that midlevel ethanol blends can be used by automakers to produce smaller, more efficient engines that will help meet future vehicle standards. We will continue to remain engaged with automakers and government stakeholders to ensure that biofuels are part of any long-term plan for engine efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction.”

The Bottom Line

Strange days in Washington. Lots of talk about RFS support at the top, but actions at the agency and department level are generally anti-RFS. The emissions order is promising for E30 ethanol, but it remains to be seen if this is an opportunity to consider better paths to high efficiency vehicles, or whether this is more of, as Doug Durante suggest it is not, a return to “days of muscle cars and wanton pollution”. Stay tuned. One thing we can all agree upon is that the Trump Administration is never boring.

Categories: Today's News

EPA grants 25 hardship waivers “so far”

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 5:21pm

In Washington, Reuters reports that the Environmental Protection Agency has “so far” granted hardship waivers for 25 smaller refiners, letting them out of the requirement to blend biofuels or purchase sufficient RINs to make up the difference. Applications continue to be received by the agency who says the conditions for receiving the waiver have not changed with the new administration despite 12 to 15 application being the norm for an average year when only half would be granted.

Categories: Today's News

St1 completes Etanolix® pilot plant at Thailand’s Ubon Bio Ethanol

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 5:20pm

In Thailand, St1 has completed the construction of Etanolix® pilot plant at Ubon Bio Ethanol Ltd’s starch and ethanol plant site in Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand. In the project St1 is piloting its own technology to produce advanced ethanol for transportation using cassava pulp as feedstock. The pilot plant will be operated for a year in several starch factories to test different environments, conditions, and seasonal changes. The pilot phase is essential to finalize the concept for a full-scale ethanol production plant using cassava pulp into an investment proposal. St1 has founded a subsidiary in Thailand, St1 Renewable Energy Thailand Ltd, to run the piloting and R&D of cassava pulp ethanol production process.

Categories: Today's News

Rabobank believes Brazil’s “ethanol parity” no longer relevant to global sugar market

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 5:19pm

In Brazil, Agrimoney reports that Rabobank believes the “ethanol parity”—or the equivalent price of ethanol in sugar terms which has traditionally dictated when mills will focus on ethanol or sugar production, depending on the better return—is no longer relevant to the global sugar market. Up until now, eyes from around the world looked to Brazilian ethanol prices to determine what the global sugar price would be and make planting or refining decisions accordingly, but the bank now says India’s sugar surplus is the main market driver.

Categories: Today's News

DuPont granted US patent for “Prevention of Bacterial Growth in Fermentation Processes”

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 5:18pm

In Delaware, DuPont Industrial Biosciences announced it has been granted U.S. Patent 9,926,576 entitled “Prevention of Bacterial Growth in Fermentation Processes.” This patent issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office covers the application of stabilized chlorine dioxide, the active ingredient in DuPont FERMASURE®, to reduce microbial contaminations in ethanol fermentations.

Acid producing bacteria are a constant challenge during the ethanol fermentation process, with the potential to reduce yield, consistency and profitability for biofuels producers. When used during fermentation, FERMASURE® controls bacterial growth without the need for antibiotics. DuPont scientists and technical service personnel have worked with the U.S. ethanol producers to validate the benefits of FERMASURE® brand stabilized chlorine dioxide in both batch and continuous fermentation conditions.

Categories: Today's News

Bioindustrial Innovation Canada invests in Benefuel’s latest financing round

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 5:17pm

In Canada, based on BIC’s assessment of Benefuel’s technology and business plan, BIC has approved an investment as part of Benefuel’s current financing round. This investment will allow Benefuel to complete the engineering needed as a final step before the construction of its first, commercial demonstration plant in Sarnia. Bioindustrial Innovation Canada (BIC) has been working with Benefuel for a number of years, providing advice and services in anticipation of Benefuel’s decision to build its first, commercial-scale ENSEL plant in Sarnia, Ont.

BIC believes the global trend towards low carbon transportation fuels, favourably positions Benefuel today. The ENSEL process combines the two main reactions for biodiesel production, esterification and trans-esterification, into a single step. This allows Benefuel to use a broad range of low cost, low carbon feedstocks resulting, in a negative carbon intensity fuel.

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Brazil to open up public comment period on RenovaBio

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 5:16pm

In Brazil, the Ministry of Mines and Energy held the first meeting of the RenovaBio Committee on Monday, formed to assist in the definition of national targets reduction of compulsory emissions to the fuel matrix. The first meeting defined the date of public consultation of the goals and presentation and approval of the Program Work Plan. The public consultation, scheduled to take place between April 30 and May 16, will provide the biofuel industry and society with the opportunity to submit contributions, suggestions, analyses and proposals.

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Tufts researchers genetically modify yeast to consume xylose

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 5:15pm

In Texas, researchers at Tufts University have created a genetically modified yeast that can more efficiently consume a novel nutrient, xylose, enabling the yeast to grow faster and to higher cell densities, raising the prospect of a significantly faster path toward the design of new synthetic organisms for industrial applications, according to a study published in Nature Communications.

In this study, the researchers noted that conventional approaches to modifying organisms to consume novel nutrients constitutively (i.e. with no “off switch”) can lead to inefficiencies when the nutrient metabolic pathways are not linked to downstream pathways for stress-responses, cell growth and other functions important for the health of the organism.

Taking a different approach, the researchers took a set of regulatory genes, called a GAL regulon, that normally processes galactose – a favorite on the yeast menu of nutrients – and replaced some of the genes with those that become activated by, and direct the breakdown of, xylose. All other genes in the GAL regulon were unchanged. In doing so, they preserved a more natural interaction between the genes that govern feeding and those that govern survival. The new synthetic regulon, dubbed XYL, enabled the yeast cells to grow more rapidly and to higher cell densities.

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EPA seeks public comment regarding isobutanol blending

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 5:13pm

In Washington, the Environmental Protection Agency is seeking public comment on any aspect of the use of isobutanol in gasoline. Butamax Advanced Biofuels, has submitted an application pursuant to the regulations titled “Registration of Fuels and Fuel Additives” for the registration of isobutanol as a gasoline additive at up to 16 volume percent. Butamax has submitted information that would likely satisfy the applicable registration requirements. The Clean Air Act requires the EPA to register a fuel or fuel additive once all the applicable registration requirements have been met by the manufacturer. Due to the potential for the widespread introduction of isobutanol into commerce, the EPA is taking steps to make the public aware of the likelihood of this registration. The agency is seeking public comment regarding any issues it should take into consideration for this registration and any supplemental actions it should consider under the Clean Air Act to further protect public health and welfare. Comments must be received on or before April 30, 2018.

Categories: Today's News

Vehicle Transformation through New Fuels: The Digest’s 2018 Multi-Slide Guide to the Clean Fuels Development Coalition

Biofuels Digest - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 4:35pm

It may be renaissance times for the Clean Fuels Development Coalition. Their long quest to upend proposed Obama-era vehicle efficiency rules that ignored the potential to improve efficiency and emissions via clear high performance fuels has recorded a small victory.

In Washington, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt determined that the greenhouse gas emission standards for model year 2022-2025 light-duty vehicles “are based on outdated information, and that more recent information suggests that the current standards may be too stringent.”  The Administrator is withdrawing the previous Final Determination issued by the agency on January 12, 2017.

Writing in the Digest, Durante said, “The recent announcement that the Trump Administration was taking another look at Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards was a welcome reality check for what is a complex and multi-layered issue. There was an immediate knee jerk reaction that this will send us back to the days of muscle cars and wanton pollution when in truth it may be one of the most positive environmental actions anyone in the ethanol space could have hoped for.

“We have argued to anyone who would listen that vehicles and fuels must be looked at as an integrated system and questioned why EPA would not use all the tools at their disposal, including fuels, and more to the point, high octane fuels. The auto industry, the Department of Energy, and countless others have made it abundantly clear that significant gains in efficiency are there to be had with higher octane fuels in conventional engines.”

Doug Duanta gave this illuminating overview of the progress on clean fuels and vehicles at ABLC 2018 in Washington DC.

Categories: Today's News

One if by land, two if by sea: The Digest’s 2018 Multi-Slide Guide to Good Fuels Marine

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 9:51pm

Netherlands-based GoodFuels Marine is on the move. We reported last month that VARO Energy subsidiary REINPLUS FIWADO Bunker and GoodFuels Marine will work together to make European inland shipping more sustainable. As a result, the sustainable advanced biofuels from GoodFuels Marine are now also available at the port of Rotterdam, and will be available along inland shipping routes in the Netherlands through the REINPLUS FIWADO Bunker network as well.

And we reported in September that BHP Billiton has teamed with Good Fuels to trial the first biofuel bunkering operation at the Port of Singapore. One of BHP Billiton’s vessels is expected to be bunkered as part of the project with other shipowners expected to participate at a later date.

Sjors Geraedts of GoodFuels Marine gave this illuminating overview of the company’s promise and progress at ABLC 2018 in Washington DC.

Categories: Today's News

The Hog’s a Hot Dog: N-Sense, Gen3Bio, Nebullam, PowerPollen, TeselaGen takin’ biotech to the next level

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 9:38pm

For a number of years we have been pointing to Iowa’s intriguing combination of feedstock, infrastructure and political consensus on renewables as a potent force in bioeconomy deployment. But these days, toss in some serious innovation chops, too — a corridor of invention stretching from St. Louis to Minneapolis and running hot across most of the Hawkeye State. Looks like the US is going to get some serious payback for all that investment in the bioeconomy going back to the aftermath of the 1980s farm crisis.

At the recent Iowa Biotechnology Association’s annual Partnering for Growth meeting, a number of technologies are worth noting for combining advanced technology with strong market application — all of them have strong prospects in what Iowa refers to as the Cultivation Corridor, and many with global implications.

Used to be that the bioregions would count on the labs of Silicon Valley and Boston to produce technologies for deployment. Not the case any more. Here are five the demonstrate the trend.

N-Sense

It’s a real-time soil nitrate sensor system for variable rate nitrogen application.

About half of the 13 million tons of N fertilizer applied to agricultural soils in the US every year is lost. This causes an annual loss of $5-6B by farmers and serious off-site environmental problems. Nitrogen use efficiency would be greatly improved, if farmers could vary the rate of N fertilizer application across their fields.

Unlike current technologies that are either model-based or require permanent installation of multiple sensors across the field, N-Sense offers a unique sensing solution that enables farmers to measure soil nitrate levels in real-time, as the sensor moves across the field, and apply N fertilizer only where it is needed. The N-Sense system will save farmers an estimated $30 to 70 per acre and reduce off-site nitrate pollution.  More about them here.

Nebullam

Nebullam is a product-as-a-service company, providing High Pressure Aeroponics growing units, paired with artificial intelligence.

As the world’s population gets set to reach between 9 and 10 billion people over the coming 30 years, building a secure and consistent food supply is necessary. Food distribution leads to almost 40% waste between harvest and point of purchase, with vegetables being the most commonly wasted product. Almost 70% of global water usage goes to agriculture. 68% of US consumers want locally sourced foods and ingredients. This includes areas with unfavorable environmental factors.

Nebullam provides a bundled solution to increase the average number of harvests to 12 per year, while reducing production labor requirements by 75%. Nebullam growing units are designed to maximize the number of harvest cycles and yield, while reducing onsite labor and input requirements. Nebullam software is designed to monitor environmental conditions and plant health, as well as to provide remote technical support. Data is continually collected, via sensors and camera, assessed, and standardized. Machine learning and machine vision applications further control environmental conditions and plant health. More about them here.

Power Pollen

Most of the major seed companies in the US are utilizing or developing some form of genetic male sterility in maize and other crops.  Despite these extensive efforts, about 80% of maize hybrid seed produced in 2015 will be accomplished in virtually the same manner as it was in the 1930s, and most of the rest in a manner that has not changed since the 1960s.  AAT’s technology takes a new look at hybrid seed production and bypasses the conventional need for male sterility, as well as the need for male plants and isolated production blocks.

While maize and soybeans were planted on approximately the same land area in the U.S. in 2015, the total value of the hybrid seed maize industry was more than four times that of the soybean seed industry.  However, producing hybrid seed is expensive relative to self-pollinated crops.  In some crops, such as soybeans and wheat, the biology of the plant is prohibitive to the economical production of hybrid seed, thus disabling the realization of the benefits of hybridity in these crops.

It’s a big market. Total value of the enablements to the US seed industry total in the billions of dollars per year, with additional value to the grain markets.  While we are keeping options open, the current route to market will be to license intellectual property to major players in the seed industry, while keeping options open for out-right sale of patents and/or parts of the company.  The current research plan will provide support for diverse IP strategies that will form the basis for all of AATs products.  More about them here.

TeselaGen

This one is Silicon Valley-based — but highly popular in the midwestern agricultural heartland, And the DNA modification market is large and fast growing, increasing from approximately $2.0 billion in 2014 to a projected $6.6 billion in 2023.

TeselaGen has developed an award winning computer aided design-build platform for biology – an advanced informatics system supporting flexible computer-aided design and manufacture for companies in Ag-tech, pharma, and industrial biotech. TeselaGen replaces costly and time-consuming traditional methods for biological design with a secure, scalable enterprise-class platform that enables a seamless “design to delivery” process.

Large companies that participate in the bio-economy are replacing traditional recombinant technologies with modern synthesis, assembly and editing techniques. This modern “synthetic biology” approach has opened the door for a radical transformation of biology and a rapid expansion of potential applications. This increased demand requires a secure, scalable, protocol-driven platform that can span multiple users working on multiple projects across large, geographically distributed organizations. These new approaches are pushing companies to update their product development methods and IP strategies to maintain their lead and competitive

TeselaGen’s Synthetic Evolution enterprise software platform links state-of-the-art biological design with automation. For example, Dow AgroSciences has used the TeselaGen platform to complete a previously intractable multi-year crop protection biomolecule design/build/test project in a just a few months, increasing DOW’s target hit rate by 10x. This success has spurred the initiation of a 2nd phase of collaboration between Dow and TeselaGen. More about them here.

Gen3 Bio

Gen3Bio exclusively licenses an effective, efficient and low cost enzymolysis of algae in water to extract fats, sugars and proteins with minimal degradation. The recovered fats, sugars and proteins can then be readily separated and converted into specialty chemicals

The EPA is targeting a municipal wastewater nutrient discharge reduction of 95%. Wastewater nutrients provide a natural algae food source. Therefore, algae can be used to reduce nutrient discharge — but how can generated algae be disposed of without sending it to landfills?

Gen3Bio aims at municipal wastewater treatment facilities, especially the 16,000+ in the United States, transforming municipal wastewater by converting landfill expenses into profitable specialty chemicals by maximizing chemical recovery yields from algae via a proprietary enzyme blend that optimizes sugar, fat and protein extraction. Over existing technologies, we increase algae product yields up to 50%, reduce capital requirements up to 90% and reduce operating expenses up to 50%. More about them here.

The Bottom Line

Innovation is innovating, change itself is changing — part of that is the shift of innovation’s traditional homes and incubation centers from the coasts to the fly-over states. Think St. Louis, Ames, Champaign-Urbana, Madison and Minneapolis-St. Paul. The DOE has been investing in a series of Bioenergy Research Centers that are often based in the rural economy, not just serving it. The investments appear to be paying off.

 

Categories: Today's News

February corn consumption for ethanol fell 9% on month

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 7:29pm

In Washington, Platts reports data from the US Department of Agriculture showing corn consumption for ethanol in February fell nearly 9% from the prior month but was 2.4% higher on the year at 433.622 million bushels with 90.7% for dry milling and 9.3% for wet milling. So far, for the marketing year that began September 1, ethanol production has been the largest user of corn at 37.6% of use. Only a fraction of sorghum was used in February compared to last year with 1.815 million hundredweights versus 6.450 million hundredweights.

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Mumias Sugar continues to produce ethanol despite lack of cane supplies

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 7:28pm

In Kenya, the Business Daily newspaper reports that beleaguered Mumias Sugar will continue to produce ethanol despite the lack of cane supplies forcing the mill to temporarily stop crushing. Cane poaching is running rampant in the area where a lack of supplies to forcing mills to secure cane out of their catchment areas, forcing up the price they pay for cane that is already one of the most expensive sugar producers in Africa. Mumias has been suffering from tough financial results the past few years, has been bailed out several times by the government and is now seeking another bailout.

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Q1 RIN prices saw biggest quarterly loss in a year

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 7:27pm

In New York state, Reuters reports that continued uncertainty about the future of the Renewable Fuel Standard forced RIN prices down to their biggest quarterly loss in a year with Oil Price Information Service data showing a range of 72 cents as a high on January 2 to a low of 35 cents in mid-March, closing out Q1 at 44.5 cents. President Trump has decided to leave RFS reform to Congress rather than continue to try to broker a deal or to reform via executive order. On Tuesday, prices fell to 38 cents after the Environmental Protection Agency granted Andeavor a small refinery exception.

Categories: Today's News

Philippines domestic ethanol prices jump another 7% in March

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 7:26pm

In the Philippines, Platts reports that domestic ethanol prices soared more than 7% in March to $1,035.2/cu m, the highest in 13 months. Higher prices were driven by a more than 20% increase in molasses prices, themselves at a six-month high. With sugar-based drinks taxed less than those made from high fructose corn syrup, sugar demand is expected to increase and further push prices for cane and molasses higher. PepsiCo already announced it would switch to 100% sugar from 60% sugar in May.

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Indonesia allotting 3.46 billion liters of biodiesel for 2018

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 7:25pm

In Indonesia, Reuters reports that the government will use biodiesel consumption in the rail sector from May at B5 and in the mining sector from July at B10 to boost demand to 3.46 billion liters, including the B20 blend mandate for road fuel and power production. Of the total, 1.47 billion liters to be allocated to Pertamina and privately-owned PT AKR Corporindo Tbk for May to October, compared to 1.41 billion liters allocated during October 2017to April 2018.

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ITC votes 4-0 to confirm injury vote against Argentine and Indonesian biodiesel

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 7:15pm

In Washington, the U.S. International Trade Commission on Tuesday voted 4-0 in favor of the National Biodiesel Board Fair Trade Coalition’s position that the industry has suffered because of unfairly dumped imports of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia. This affirmative vote on injury is the last remaining procedural hurdle before final antidumping orders can be issued later this month. Last month, the U.S. Department of Commerce calculated final dumping rates ranging from 60.44 to 86.41 percent for Argentine producers, and 92.52 to 276.65 percent for Indonesian producers.

Categories: Today's News

University of Illinois researchers determine feed value for wheat co-products

Biofuels Digest - Tue, 04/03/2018 - 7:14pm

In Illinois, with feed costs and the worldwide demand for meat growing, livestock producers are increasingly turning to co-products from the ethanol and human food industries. Research from the University of Illinois is helping to determine the feed value of wheat middlings and red dog, two co-products of the wheat milling process that can be included in diets fed to pigs and other livestock. Researchers noted that the sources of wheat middlings did not vary greatly in composition and digestibility of energy and nutrients, and offers possible explanations for the greater digestibility of energy and nutrients in red dog.

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